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Recipe: ScandiKitchen's Sweet Potato & Rye Salad

Sweet_potato_ copy

We get asked for this recipe so much that, in the end, we simply decided it had to be shared with the world. It is not a traditional Nordic recipe, but rather one that draws on all the flavours we love so much. The tarragon has the aniseed type flavour, the rye is our staple... The sweetness of the potatoes. It all simply adds up to one amazing dish.

Created for us with our good friend Kobi Ruzicka, an extremely talented and amazing chef, we highly recommend adding this to your menu at home. 

You can source rye grain at our deli or online from health food stores. Make sure you go for the whole grain, not the cracked ones. If you can't get rye, go for another grain - spelt works fine.

Rye grain & Sweet potato salad – serve warm or cold.

Recipe by Kobi Ruzicka for Scandikitchen © 2013. 

Serves 2-4 people. Keeps for a day or so in the fridge, but best eaten on the day.

  • 2 cups of rye grains (or whole wheat, spelt or other grain – we much prefer rye

    grain as it is super Nordic)

  • 6 sweet potatoes (depending on size)

  • 1 supermarket sized bunch tarragon

  • 1 bunch spring onion

  • 1 packet feta (approx 200g)

  • Dash of balsamic vinegar 

  • Olive oil, seasoning

Starting one day in advance: Soak the rye grains (or whole wheat) overnight in double the amount of water. The next day, drain and rinse the grains. Place in a large pot with a good pinch of salt and cook for approx. 25 mins (from boiling), or until tender. Drain and allow to cool completely (cooked grains keeps for a few days in the fridge and can be made ahead).

Wash and slice sweet potato (skin on) into chunky sized pieces, toss with olive oil, salt and pepper. Place on tray and roast at 160 degrees C, turning occasionally, until cooked through (but not over cooked).

Separate the leaves of the tarragon from the stalks, place in a bowl, discard the stalks. Remove the first outer layer from the spring onions, then slice finely at a large angle (tops included). Add to the tarragon. With your fingers lightly crumble the feta into the same bowl. Lastly, add the part cooled sweet potatoes and fold gently. 

Adjust seasoning with balsamic, salt and pepper and more oil, if needed.

The grains can be cooked on the day without soaking - however, soaking allows for a more even texture throughout the grain and shortens the cooking time

 

June 22, 2014

WIN the last ever Wallander series on DVD

Wallander

The last episodes of Wallander, ever, are out on DVD Monday 23rd June (Arrow Films).

We've got a copy to give away to one lucky person.

To be in with a chance to win, simply answer this question:

Wallander's dog is called:

a) Mussi

b) Jussi

c) Frank

Answer to iloveherring@scandikitchen.co.uk before Wednesday 25th June 2014 at noon. Winner will be drawn at random from correct entries. Usual competition rules apply. No cheating and no alternative prize and so on.

Get your hands on the DVD series in all good stores or online - it's a really really good one!

 

June 19, 2014

"Jordgubbstårta" Midsummer Layer Cake - the recipe

Cake

Ahhhh.... This is such a nice cake. It tastes of summer. Pure summer. We re-tested the recipe last night and the result lasted only for as long as it took us to eat it. With second helpings. 

For us, no Midsummer is complete without strawberrry layercakes, also known as "Jordgubbsstårta".

If you want to cheat and make it easy for yourself, cheat's notes are at the bottom of the post. We do feel that it is worth the effort, though, to make everything from scratch.

For the Strawberry layers

700g strawberries, washed, trimmed and sliced

75g raspberry jam

For the vanilla patisserie cream

NOTE: Needs to be cooled before using in the cake or the cream will split.

1 vanilla pod

500ml whole milk

6 egg yolks

140g caster sugar

45g corn flour

Split the vanilla pod and scrape out the seeds and add to a saucepan with the milk. Bring to the boil. Take care not to burn and turn off heat as soon as boiling point is reached.

Whisk egg yolk and sugar until it goes almost white, then turn off the whisk and add the corn flour.  Turn the whisk back on medium and slowly add the hot milk to the bowl, whisking continuously.

Pour the mixture back into the saucepan and bring back to the boil and cook for 1 minute to thicken. Turn off, sieve the mixture into a bowl, cling film and cool down completely in the fridge before using.

For the cake layers

5 eggs

150g caster sugar

130g plain flour

1 tsp. vanilla sugar

How to:

Heat the oven to 200 degrees Celcius.

Trace 3 identical circles onto baking paper – approximately 20-22 cm diameter.  Place baking paper onto flat baking trays.

Whisk egg and sugar until white and fluffy. The key here, is to whisk for a long time to incorporate as much air as possible as there are not raising agents in the mixture.

Sift flour and vanilla sugar into the egg mixture and fold, very carefully, until completely incorporated. Preserve as much air as possible, so fold carefully but thoroughly.

Carefully divide the batter between the three circles and ensure batter fills the circles all the way around, neatly.

Bake in the oven until just golden brown and done – this will depend on your oven, but 5-6 minutes is usually fine.

Remove from and leave to cool completely on a cooling rack.  Very carefully remove the baking paper – if it sticks, wet the back of the paper a little bit and it should come off with more ease.

For the Whipped Cream

700ml whipping cream

2 tbs icing sugar

1 tsp vanilla sugar

On high speed, whisk all ingredients until stiff peaks form. The cream needs to be quite firm to hold when decorating the cake - but take care not to over whip.

Divide the cream into two equal portions.  Fold one half of the whipped cream together with the cold vanilla patisserie cream until completely incorporated (The other half is used to decorate the final cake).

Place the first layer cake on the plate you wish to serve on. Spread a nice layer of raspberry jam, follow by a 1cm thick layer of the patisserie cream / whipped cream mixture. Add a good handful of sliced strawberries evenly spread out. Add another cake layer and repeat over again and then add the final cake layer on top (You may have a bit of excess custard cream left).

Using a palette knife, spread a thin layer of the whipped cream on the top of the cake. Using a piping bag with a star nozzle, add the rest of the whipped cream and pipe carefully around the edge of the cake in an up-and-down motion until the sides are completely covered. If you do not have a piping bag, you can use the palette knife for this and just make smooth edges.  If you prefer less cream and a more rustic look you can omit the cream around the edges all together.

Finish by adding the remaining strawberries on the top of the cake. It doesn’t have to look too arranged – just scatter them so the cake is evenly covered.

This cake greatly improves after a few hours in the fridge so all the flavours are soaked into the cake layers.

Cheat Notes:

Cake layers – in speciality shop, you can buy sponge layers already baked. (Scandi Kitchen sells ‘Lagkage bunde’ – already come split into three layers). 

Crème patisserie: We stock a product called 'Kagecreme' from Maizana which is sachet of instant creme patisserie. Mix one sachet with 500ml cold milk, wait ten minutes and it is ready to use.

Substituting with custard will not give you the exact same result, but you CAN do it at a push – but don’t use half and half, use ¼ custard to ¾ whipped cream volume. Omit the sugar in the whipped cream as custard is really sweet.

 

June 12, 2014

Midsummer the Danish way

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Danes celebrate Midsummer differently to the Swedes. So, if you fancy doing it a bit different this year, follow this mini-guide

Pick the right date

Midsummer in Denmark is mostly known as Sankt Hans Aften, and is celebrated on 23rd June. We don’t move the date around like the Swedes do. In some parts of the British Isles St John's Eve is observed at the same time. They're essentially the same event.

Collect a lot of sticks

In a similar way to our British and Irish cousins, Danish midsummer is all about bonfires. Ideally on a beach or in a town square. Big, huge bonfires. Start collecting twigs now; you'll need a lot.

Heks

Get back into witch burnings

Top off your bonfire with a few straw witches dressed in old lady clothes. Legend says that on the longest night of the year, you burn a few witches and send them off to Brocken mountain in Germany to dance with the Devil. Some stuff the witches with firecrackers, which is not a good idea and quite possibly against the law here. Yes, it’s a bit like Guy Fawkes except it’s not about blowing up parliaments. 

Have a summery dinner with friends and family

Every Scandi tradition revolves around food.  Because the bonfire is not lit until 10pm, you have plenty of time for a Danish midsummer buffet in the garden. In the rain. It is likely to be raining at some point. Don't forget umbrellas.

The-North-East-Skinny-Dip (1)

Find an excuse to go skinny dipping

This is where we deviate from the Brits. If you happen to celebrate by the beach, you'll need minimal encouragement to get your kit off for a swim. In town squares, wait and see what everybody else fancies doing. But do accept that sometimes the skinny dipping doesn’t happen. 

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Bake snobrød

The Danes believe they invented snobrød, which are pieces of bread dough rolled around a wooden stick and cooked on the bonfire. If you've ever seen campfire twisted bread, you'll have a good idea of what snobrød is, because it is the same thing.

Eat your snobrød

It’s unlikely that the snobrød will actually ever bake properly, unless you twist and turn it for about two hours over the last embers of the bonfire - and who wants to do that? If you can get the half-baked dough off the stick, fill the hole with strawberry jam. It doesn’t taste any nicer, but it sure doesn't make it any worse. Eating unbaked dough will leave you with a stomach ache - all part of the experience.

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Pølser

Sausages! You need sausages. Throw them onto the fire, scramble around looking for them with a stick, poke them until you’re sure they're on fire, remove from bonfire. Eat. Burn tongue. Enjoy. Make your kids do the same to help them develop fond memories of Danish Midsummer on the beach.

Vi_elsker_dig__du_kaere_O

Vi elsker vort land

We Love Our Country is a song also known as 'Midsommervisen' - the midsummer song. It's an old hymn about midsummer and how much we love our country. Nobody ever knows the second verse. However, everyone knows the modern version by Shu-bi-dua, an old Danish pop group. We all prefer this version.  Someone will play other songs by Shu-bi-dua. We may all join in with their classic song (There Is A) Dogshit In My Garden, because this is how Danes roll. We all giggle.

The guy with the guitar

If you see the guy with the guitar, either run or stay close, depending on how you feel. He will almost certainly have a beard and look a bit like Thor (if Thor was born in 1971). He usually sings with his eyes closed. His name is Bent. Or Kaj. Or Flemming. He will encourage everybody to hold hands.

Drink Tuborg

You’re on the beach, man. Drink beer. If you go to the beach with someone’s parents, they will bring a box (yes, a box) of wine and plastic glasses half full of sand. Stick to Tuborg. You've been warned.

Ha' en dejlig midsommer aften!

x

How to celebrate midsummer the Swedish way

Sommar

Wherever you are in the world at midsummer time, you will be able to find gatherings of lost-looking Swedes to celebrate with. Follow our lead and you’ll be able to infiltrate the groups inconspicuously.

Choose the day

Midsummer is the longest day of the year and falls around 23rd June. Swedes always move it to the closest Friday afternoon and evening, which is 20th June this year. In Sweden, celebrations are on the Friday evening. Here in London, we can't persuade our bosses to let us drink aquavit on a Friday afternoon, so things get going on Saturday. Check to see what's happening in your local area.

If you are in London, maybe just happen to be passing by Hyde Park. Nothing official, you know, but we gather there is a chance a few Swedes will be meeting up and dancing and singing for a bit. Around midday. Near Speaker's Corner. They have been doing that for years and years, so there's a good chance they'll be doing it again. 

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Get outside

It's midsummer, and you're celebrating nature. Go to the park, a lake, or a field.

Don't forget your umbrella.

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Wear a garland in your hair

Essential attire for women. You can make a floral garland from wire and flowers and staple it onto your ears - learn how to HERE. Alternatively, H&M do a nice range, being Swedish. Men can wear the garland too, and most do after a few drinks.

Clothing

White and floral is the style for women - but not so much that you appear to be going to a meeting of Chintz Anonymous. Paired with the garland, it will make you look amazing and a bit pagan. Wear your hair down like Freya. Or Loreen.

Gentlemen, it's all about pastels. Tight trousers (white, yellow), pointy shoes, a pink shirt and Ray Bans. You want to make it seem like all this is a bit beneath you. Sport a fashionable beard or moustache. Google 'Stureplan fashion' for an idea of how actual Swedish metrosexuals achieve this look. 

Food

You need to get yourself a Swedish Midsummer picnic (can be ordered here) or make your own – here’s an easy guide: CLICK HERE FOR MIDSUMMER RECIPES

Smorgas

Smörgastårta

Means Sandwich Cake. It’s a thing. A cake that is not a cake but a massive sandwich. If you make a Sandwich Cake every Swede in the vicinity will love you forever. Seriously.

Nubbe

A nubbe (the plural is 'nubbar') is a little shot of aquavit and it’s essential to get hold of these. Make sure you bring cold ones to the park. Recommended dose is two beers to one nubbe. Take care, it’s strong stuff - and if you can’t do it properly, Swedes will see through you. Keep your head in one piece until you can speak fluent Swedish (three nubbar or more) and nobody will notice you’re an imposter. 

Buy aquavit at our place - we stock many kinds, both online and in the shop in London 

Snapsvisor

Drinking songs you need to learn for when you drink your nubbar. Just learn this one (see below) and you’ll be fine.

If you are stuck, sing Euphoria.  

Maypole

Our maypole is used in June, which technically makes it a Junepole. Like here, it's also decorated with lovely flowers, as well as two circular garlands either side at the top. Just to reinforce the symbolism of what it means (think about it...). We raise the pole around lunch time. If you end up celebrating in Hyde Park in London, you may have to pretend there is a maypole because health and safety means no pole is officially allowed, so we dance around our handbags instead.

Little Frogs

Every Swede sings this song. Everyone. And does the actions, which involve jumping about like a frog.

Games

After the dancing and the cake and a bit more drinking, we get physical.  Games of kubb (a tactical, skittles-like game that has its roots in Viking times), tug of war, arm wrestling and naked mud slinging.

Okay, so we don’t do the last one. Except when we do.

 

Inge

What next?

Dancing. If you are cool and dressed like someone from Stockholm's Stureplan (and, frankly, still standing), you may want to head to a club for some dancing and more drinking. 

Here's a link to the hottest ticket in London town this year 

Here's a really great place to go if you just want to be with Swedes and friends and drink great cocktails More here

If you're up for something more traditional, dust off a CD player and pop on some dansband CDs (and ABBA, obv). Pay a visit to the ScandiKitchen toilets for dansband suggestions. You'll see what we mean.

Midsommarblomster-med-kudde

Seven flowers

If you don’t have a partner, pick seven different kinds of flowers and put them under your pillow and you will dream of the person you'll marry. If you’re not willing to put all your eggs in one basket, head to a bar and revel in the fact that this is the one time of year where Swedes are not at all reserved. The birth rate always spikes in Sweden about nine months after midsummer. 

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The next day

You will wake, having dreamt about the person you will marry. There may be images flashing before your eyes of people wearing yellow trousers. Flashes of blue and yellow flags and memories of having an arm-wrestle with a lamp post. Midsummer comes but once a year. Thank goodness. 

Glad Midsommar!

June 05, 2014

How to create a midsummer picnic - the easy way

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How to create a midsummer picnic - the easy way

Midsummer occurs at exactly the same time as the summer solstice. It’s a wonderful time of year where we have almost round-the-clock daylight and try to tap into as much of it as we can, preparing ourselves for the long dark winter days ahead.

In Sweden, 'midsommar' sort of means picnics. It also means midsummer maypoles, aquavit, dancing, fun and frolics, and maybe a sing-song or two. It means flowers in your hair, and it definitely means local food eating outdoors with friends and family.

If you want to try your hand at a typically Scandi midsummer picnic, here’s our easy guide to doing it yourself. And don't worry if you think you'll have problems getting some of the trickier ingredients - we've suggested alternatives throughout.

What to make and pack

The emphasis is on seasonality and authentic produce.

Herring

It’s just not Scandi unless there's herring, so don't be squeamish and give it a try. At midsummer, we enjoy Matjes herring in particular. A lot more delicate than the usual pickled herring, it goes very well with the season's new potatoes.

We usually have at least two types of herring, so try one with Swedish mustard dressing – ABBA’s Senaps Sill is great.

Some UK supermarkets do have Scandi brands of pickled herring, so go for those if you can as they have a sweeter brine. Matjes herring is available online from ScandiKitchen.co.uk and you can also get it at Ocado. Rollmop herring is easy to find, but it is rather sourer than what we have in Scandinavia, and we have it in chunks rather than rolled lengths - avoid unless there's nothing else.

New potatoes

A must-have. Get really good quality new potatoes, boil and cool down to bring along to the picnic. Some people like them very plain, some like them tossed in dill. We prefer them in a light dill dressing as follows:

Cook the potatoes as described above. You can use slightly warm potatoes for this, or cooled ones straight out of the fridge. The most important part is to dress them just before serving.

Prepare the dressing:

• 75ml sunflower oil or other light oil

• 25ml white wine vinegar

• 1 tbsp Dijon mustard

• 1 tbsp caster sugar

• 1 medium shallot, very finely chopped

• 1 bunch of dill, finely chopped

• Salt and pepper to taste

Whisk the liquids, mustard and sugar until the sugar has dissolved, then fold in the chopped shallot and dill. Pour the dressing over the potatoes and make sure each potato is coated.

Gräddfill 

Swedish sour cream. There's no direct British equivalent (due to the fat content), but if you mix half natural yoghurt to half crème fraîche, you'll get something very close. Make a small batch so you have enough to pour over the potatoes and Matjes herring as a dip or dressing. Add a handful of finely chopped chives to the mixture.  

We do sell Gräddfil at ScandiKitchen if you want to get hold of the real thing.

Beetroot salad

This makes an appearance at every festive season. It’s delicious and simple to make, but you can easily buy our own from ScandiKitchen or Ocado.

To make it yourself, drain a jar of Scandi pickled beetroot and lightly chop them. Mix with one chopped tart apple. Add enough crème fraîche and mayonnaise to create a light pink hue, then season with salt, pepper, a dash of balsamic and maybe a squeeze of lemon juice if needed. Leave to set. 

If you use British pickled beetroot, you may need to add sugar for a more authentically sweeter taste.

Meatballs

Of course. Did you think we could have a picnic with no meatballs? 

Make or buy. If you decide to make, do so a day in advance, as it takes quite a while to make a full batch. If you buy, we highly recommend either Per i Viken or Mamma Scans. Either way, eat them cold.

Salmon

We love salmon, but it can be a bit difficult to sit and eat on a picnic. We suggest making a cured salmon salad with new potatoes. You can omit the potatoes if you don’t want to double up on spuds for your picnic.

  • 300g cooked, cooled new potatoes, halved
  • 200g cured salmon (or smoked salmon, if you prefer)
  • 100g green beans, blanched, cut into 3-4 cm pieces
  • 150g green asparagus, blanched, cooled, cut into 3-4 cm pieces
  • 100g green peas, blanched, cooled
  • 10 cherry tomatoes, halved
  • A handful of crunchy green leaves (from iceberg to frisée – whatever you prefer)
  • 1/3 cucumber, cubed
  • 1 tbsp chopped chives 
  • Sprigs of dill to decorate

Fold together and dress lightly with gravlax sauce, which is a dill and mustard dressing. We stock it, as do some supermarkets. 

Green salad

Nobody will eat it, but it’s pretty and looks like you've make a massive effort. Optional, of course.

Cheeses

Go for a lump of lovely Swedish Västerbotten or Prast. Don’t forget the cheese slicer.

If you want to show off, make a Väststerbottenpaj. It's a cheese quiche made with Västerbotten and full-fat cream. The dressing for the quiche is easy: a small jar of red lumpfish roe mixed with 100ml of crème fraîche. Or just buy a cheese quiche and smile sweetly.

Bread

This bit is important. You have to have crispbread, of course. Go for Leksands or Pyramid, both are very nice. Crusty bread is also common - get a baguette or some seeded rolls, whatever you fancy. Just don't forget the butter. 

Sweet stuff

Midsummer is all about the humble strawberry, and you’ll need to incorporate strawberries into your picnic somehow. If you're having it in your garden, you could make a jordgubbstårta – a strawberry layer cake – but that would be hard to bring along to a picnic. Instead, we suggest a few punnets of strawberries with a bit of cream and you’re done. If you want to bake, make a delicious Swedish sticky chocolate cake called a kladdkaka the day before. Chill it and slice before you leave (it's slightly under-baked and sticky, so you can only cut it while cold).

Serve with the cream and strawberries. Here's the recipe for kladdkaka.

Booze

Aquavit, cider and beers. You can add wine or champagne, but be careful of mixing aquavit and wine. We recommend a bottle of Skåne aquavit or Hallands Fläder, both are nice and summery. Only ever drink very cold, and as shots. For beers, go for Tuborg or Pistonhead. Rekordelig or Kopperberg are good cider options and probably the easiest thing on your shopping list to obtain. 

If you can't get aquavit, try flavouring a bottle of vodka. Google "make your own Swedish aquavit" for ideas.

Singing

Once you crack open the aquavit, the desire to sing will become evident. Prepare some good old Swedish ‘snapsvisor’, aka drinking songs. If you don’t speak Swedish, just pretend to be the Swedish Chef from The Muppets for a few minutes. More aquavit helps with that. Please be aware that after two shots of the strong stuff, you are likely to be fluent in Swedish, just by default.

Midsummer maypole etiquette

If there is a maypole, you need to dance around it. Not on your own, but with other people. Let them take the lead if you are unsure (and you will be unsure, so let them take the lead). If you find yourself pretending to be a little frog, this is quite normal. More aquavit helps with that.

Dress code

Well, there's not a dress code as such (although UK midsummer celebrations probably should include an anorak and umbrella). Women tend to wear white clothing, with wild flowers in their hair. This is of course optional, especially when it comes to keeping tidy during a picnic, although the floral hair arrangements can get quite competitive. Men tend to wear stuff that makes them look even more Swedish. Like tight trousers, maybe even yellow ones. We don't really advise either, if we're honest.

And that's it. Just have a lovely day whatever you do. Glad Midsommar!

 

Recipe: Blueberry, Gorgonzola and rye crouton salad

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Blueberry, Gorgonzola & Rye crouton salad

This is probably one of the easiest salads in the world to make. The marriage between blueberries and gorgonzola is ever lasting - fruity, creamy, tasty.

Serves 2-4 people

What you need:

1 bag of mixed salad leaves (120-140g) (we prefer ones containing beetroot leaves as these go very well) 

1 packet of blueberries (180-230g)

1 packet (150g) of Gorgonzola cheese 

2 slices of seeded rye bread

A small handful of walnuts (toasted) (optional)

How to…

Arrange the salad directly on four small plates – or on a big serving platter (as preferred).

Scatter the salad leaves across the plate, then the blueberries. 

Spoon out small lumps of Gorgonzola cheese across the serving plate.

Add the walnuts either whole or slightly broken up.

Toast the rye bread, the cut into small croutons (don’t over toast it or it will be hard to eat  – the bread should still be slightly chewy). Then tear and scatter the bread onto the plate.

Dressing:

This salad thrives on strong tastes from the creamy cheese and the berries.  It really doesn’t need seasoning or oil – but instead, choose a really good aged thick balsamic vinegar or glaze and sprinkle lightly just before eating.

May 29, 2014

Recipe: Smoked Mackerel salad with fennel and apple

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Ahhh, hello summer. 

Try this salad - it may sound simple, but it is very delicious.

Smoked Mackerel Salad with Fennel, Apple and peas

Serves 2

  • 1 packet smoked mackerel fillets (approx. 250-300g)
  • A large handful of mixed salad leaves
  • ½ fennel bulb
  • ½ tart apple such as Pink Lady or Granny Smith
  • 200g frozen peas
  • A tablespoon chopped chives
  • A tablespoon of fresh tarragon
  • Salt, pepper, a dollop of olive oil and a squeeze of lemon juice

Dressing:

  • 50g honey
  • 15g whole grain mustard
  • 15g red wine vinegar

Finely shave fennel on mandolin or with a very sharp knife and place in a bowl.  Then shave the apple in similar thin pieces. Combine with fennel, then dress with lemon juice and a few drops of olive oil.

Arrange the mixed leaves on individual plates or a large flat serving dish.

Thaw the peas and sprinkle on the leaves along with the tarragon and chives. 

Tear bite sized pieces of smoked mackerel and arrange across the salad (taking care to check for bones), then add the fennel and apple pieces on top.

To make the dressing, whisk ingredients with a fork then use sparingly on the salad, as needed. Season to taste with salt and pepper (depending on the seasoning of the fish), you may not need to use much).

Enjoy immediately.

May 23, 2014

Gravlax & Potato Summer Salad

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Serves 2-4 people.

This is a wonderful summery cured salmon salad. Perfect for any Smorgasbord.  The ingredients can be changed to fit personal taste – sometimes, we add boiled egg to the recipe, or whatever crunchy veg we have in the fridge… 

When we have this salad on at the café, it is one of the most popular salads. Healthy, filling, delicious and authentic all in one.

Ingredients

  • 300g cooked, cooled new potatoes, halved
  • 200g cured salmon (or normal smoked salmon, if you prefer)
  • 100g green beans, blanched, cut into 3-4 cm pieces
  • 150g blanched green asparagus, cooled, cut into 3-4 cm pieces
  • 100g green peas, blanched, cooled
  • 10 cherry tomatoes, halved
  • A handful of crunchy green leaves (from iceberg to frisee – which ever you prefer)
  • 1/4 cucumber, cubed
  • 1 tbs chopped chives
  • Sprigs of dill to decorate

Add all ingredients to a bowl and mix gently. Arrange on a serving tray and drizzle over 2 large tablespoons of dill and mustard dressing. You can buy ready made Dill & Mustard dressing here 

Dill and mustard dressing – how to… (this will make a larger quantity than needed but you can keep it in the fridge for a week and use for sandwiches or other salads)

  • 2 tbs of Swedish Mustard (we really like Slotts Senap)
  • 1 tbs white vinegar

  • 1 tsp sugar 

  • A pinch of salt and pepper
  • 100 ml of rapeseed oil

  • 4 tbs finely chopped fresh dill

Mix mustard, sugar and vinegar in a bowl. Add the oil carefully, start by adding a few drops, then steadily adding a thin stream of oil to emulsify the dressing. If you add it too quickly it will split. Keep whisking until you have a good, creamy consistency.  Add a little bit more oil if it is too thick.

May 07, 2014

18 ways to be more Norwegian

We'll be celebrating Norwegian Constitution Day on 17th May along with the rest of Norway - so we thought we'd make a little selection of ways you can be more Norwegian:

 

1. When you 'gå på tur' (go for a hike) you always bring a Kvikk Lunsj and an orange. And you never,  EVER, allow anyone who isn't Norwegian to call your Kvikk Lunsj a 'Kit-Kat'.

Kvikklunsj 

 

2. Eat brunost. Enthuse about brunost. Wonder why no one else eats a brown cheese made from whey that looks like brown Plasticine but tastes of caramel and sheer happiness when sliced and put on top of warm waffles that you've made yourself in your heart-shaped waffle iron using batter you keep in your fridge for every occasion that requires waffles.

Vaffel_ost_wilfa

 

3. Eat a frozen pizza called the Grandiosa. Enthuse about a frozen pizza called the Grandiosa. The Grandiosa is the best pizza ever. Italy has nothing on the Grandiosa. Nothing.

F-Brødtekst-grandiosa

 

4. Sweden is good for one thing - the fleske-safari (meat safari). Meat is cheaper in Sweden, so it's worth crossing that border for meat. And booze. And everything else. Everything is cheaper in Sweden.

   Border

 

5. Sweden will never be better than Norway at anything. Apart from the price of everything. But of that you shall never speak openly.

  Swedes

(Denmark will never be better than Norway at anything. Apart from its easy availability of booze. Which you can talk about).  

 

6. Wear cool genser jumpers like this. Perfect for occasions such as being in temperatures of -20, Eurovision, fishing and crossing the border to acquire meat.

Jumper

 

7. Wear the 'bunad' national dress as if you were born in it. Yes, it itches, but that's part of the charm. You'll keep telling yourself. A lot.

Bunad

8. If you're well known for something, become a Norgesvenn - a famous friend of Norway. Norgesvenner in the past included the late Roald Dahl and Leroy from Fame. Today, Linda Evans from Dynasty, Bonnie Tyler and A1 have the honour.

Linda

 

9. In the summer, partake in a ‘Grillfest’. For this you should wear a ‘Grilldress’, which is a shellsuit in bright colours. Also required: curly hair and a fake moustache, plus socks and sandals. Harry Enfield's Scousers are your style icons.

  Grilldress

 

10. Celebrate Taco Friday at home. Every Friday. Unless you’re having Grandiosa, then it’s okay not to have Tacos. TACOS!

SecondColumn

 

11. Eat boiled sheep’s head, dried lamb sticks or cod preserved in lye. And fermented trout - that you should also get down with. 

  Smalahoved-kalrotstappe

 

12. Hyttetur. Every weekend, go to a cabin. Any cabin. If you don’t have a cabin near a fjord, go to your garden shed, even if you live in a bedsit in Hackney. Also, on the way, make sure to repeat point 1. (If you're in Hackney, we sell Kvikk Lunsj at ScandiKitchen.)  Use motivating sentences such as 'Ut på tur, aldri sur' (literally: 'out on a hike, never angry').

  Hytte

 

13. Every summer, go to Syden for two weeks vacation. This basically just means ‘The South’. Copenhagen counts. Or Oslo, if you're from Trondheim.

Syden

 

14. Use the term ‘Utepils’, meaning ‘to sit outside and have a beer, even if the sun just came out four minutes ago’. We do that here in the UK too, but we don't have the word for it.

Utepils

Utepils Photo Richard Sagen 

 

15. Flags. Celebrate your flag, every day of the year and especially on 17th May. On this day, purchase seven more flags to your collection. Wave them all around. 

7012961-norske-flag

 

16. Norwegians are born with skis on their feet. Uncomfortable for the mothers, but useful once they learn to stand up and navigate down snow covered mountains. If you can’t ski, don’t move to Norway.

  Snow baby skiing

 

17. Enjoy your hotdog wrapped in a potato pancake. It's a thing.

Hotdog

 

And finally: 17th May - 'Syttende Mai'. 

Celebrate Norway's national day on 17th May. No exceptions.

You are proud of Norway. 17th May is the most important day of the year, better than Christmas, birthday and Eurovision put together. The Norwegian Constitution Day is a day celebrated by all Norwegians and Norgesvenner (see above).

Get up, eat Norwegian food, wear a bunad (see above) sing songs about how much you love Norway. Wave flags around a lot. Ice cream. Waffles (see above). Brown cheese (see above). Repeat. Follow with alcohol (possibly purchased in Sweden). Forget how you got home, but wake up loving Norway even more than before.

Happy 17th May, everybody - see you at the ScandiKitchen or the park.

17.mai_london 

May 01, 2014

ScandiKitchen's Eurovision Bingo 2014

Every year we play Eurovision Bingo. This year is no exception. Play live with us on our Twitter feed during all the shows - from the semi finals to the grand final on 10th May. 

You can find us on Twitter here 

We're handing out Eurovision Bingo Cards all next week at the cafe so make sure you pick yours up when you pop by to stock up for your Eurovision Party at home.

2014_sk_eurovision_bingo

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